Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis Review


What makes some PC stand out from others? Some have windows to display all the components and pretty lights on the inside. Some have sexy custom paint jobs on both high end gamer and stock cases. Then there are those like the Cooler Master Sileo 500, not focusing on flashy looks but focusing on another area that some PC users find appealing, silence. At first glance the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis might not look appealing to show off, but it’s what on the inside that counts. The guts of this streamlined, mid-tower case are lined with sound damping foam and vibration reducing strips to shut up even the noisiest of computers. Let’s take a closer look at what makes this little guy so quite:

Product Provided By: Cooler Master

Closer Look:

Like most computer boxes, this one is not a looker. The outside displays a picture of the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis, and all of the specs that you would need to know for the case.

 
 
 

For shipping the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis is wrapped in plastic wrap and securely mounted between Styrofoam to ensure little to no damage is inflicted upon your new case.

 

The case itself might not jump out and instantly be appealing to some gamers, unless they are looking to shut up the beast that is there computer. With a black metal exterior, some part look as if they have been lightly brushed to give the case a touch of class.

 
 
 
 

Included with the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis is all the screws and motherboard mounts that you will ever need, included with the screws are four slightly longer screws which I will touch on later. Also there are three sets of rails to easily mount you three favorite hard drives inside. This might not seem like much to come with the case, but this case is 100% tool less, and unlike some tool less cases that I have used in the past, this one actually works well.

Let’s see some of the working components:

Closer Look:

Located on the front of the Cooler Master Siuleo 500 Chassis are two USB ports, an eSATA port, and a plug for a mic and HD audio. Also located on the front are what at first I thought where to just be LEDs to indicate power and HDD activity but could figure out what the third one was. Soon I realized that since I couldn’t locate any switches else where that these where actually the power and reset buttons, and that the third was for HDD activity.

 
 

When it comes to the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis there aren’t many options for fans. Stock there are two installed, an 80mm in the front and a 120mm mounted in the rear to aid in the cooling process. Honesty the 120mm fan would have to be what I found to be the noisiest part of this case. I swear that if a moth farted next to this case, the produced sound from the moth would drown out the minuscule amount of noise that this fan actually produces.

 

This case is completely lined with sound dampening foam to silence even the loudest of cases, or even put the quietest ones out there to shame. The foam is found inside both side panels, on the ceiling and floor of the case. The mount for the PSU is also surrounded with vibration reducing strips to make sure that the PSU doesn’t move and further ensuring the silence of this case.

 

 

While I found that I almost had to force the PSU into position, it still felt like it knew it belonged there, and once in position I could already tell that it wasn’t going anywhere unless I wanted it to. Earlier I mentioned four slightly longer screws, and now is when they come into play. Because of all the foam and strips the PSU doesn’t fit tightly against the back of the case when first inserted. These four screws reach past the foam and strips and allow you to pull the PSU tightly against the back of the case.

 

The front bezel, which is made of aluminum and not plastic like most, easily pops off for easy access to the steel face for those looking for potential case modification. Unlike some bezels out there, this one comes off 100% because there are no wires actually attached to the inside of the bezel. While it might not have a huge amount of additional space for adding, I again have to emphasize that this case isn’t about modding, it is build for silence. Hidden behind the front bezel is a small 80mm fan that for its size still moves a good amount of air. There are 5 slots for ODD’s with a super secure, and what I found easy to use tool less slides that allowed for quick and easy removal for any drives that you might need to work with. If you’re not completely confident in the tool less slides there are also places to insert screws to ensure that your drives are securely mounted and locked in place.

 

Now let’s take a look at the specs and features:

Specifications:

ModelRC-500-KKN1-GP
 
ColorBlack
 
Dimension(L)480 x (W)200 x (H)432 mm
 
Weight17.6lbs; 8 kg
 
M/B TypeMicro-ATX, ATX
 
5.25″ Drive Bay5 Exposed
 
3.5″ Drive Bay1 Exposed; 4 Hidden
 
Cooling SystemFront: One 120 x 25 mm silent fan 800 rpm
Rear: One 120 x 25 mm silent fan 800 rpm
 
I/O PanelUSB x 2, eSATA x 1, Mic x 1, Audio x 1
 
Power SupplyStandard ATX PS2 (optional)

Features:


 

  • Sound-proof design for a quiet computing experience
  • Subtle ventilation holes located between side and front panels
  • Easy access front I/O panel with support for e-SATA
  • 5.25″ and 3.5″ tool-free design for easy installation and upgrade
  • Aluminum bezel with Elegant design
  • Detachable anti-vibration HDD pads for noise reduction
  • Stylish front LED
Super Silent Operation

 

  • Acoustic foam sound insulation for quiet computing experience
  • Anti-vibration noise reduction pads
Highlights

 


Detachable anti-vibration HDD pads for noise reduction

 


5.25″ and 3.5″ tool-free design for easy installation

 


Stylish front LED

 


Spacious interior to accommodate for various computer components (optional)

Now Lets get to some testing:

Testing Setup:

  • CPU: Q6600
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3
  • Memory: 2 x 2GB Kingston
  • OS: Windows XP Home SP3
  • Video Card: ATI Radeon 2400 HD
  • Power Supply: 550 W PSU

Testing:

For testing I will be watching for a few things. When it comes to cases there are a few ways to look for quality. Most benchmarks for PC cases are to watch the temperatures of some of the components, so this is what I will be monitoring. For this I will note the temps of the CPU, GPU, HDD, and the ambient Temp inside the case. I will be testing it against a Super Case. To get the temp up on the computers I will be running Prime 95 Burn-in test. The ambient temp in the room will be maintained at a constant 19° C. While I wish that I could also do an ambient noise test, I just simply don’t have the tools do so, so please just take my word for it that this thing is next to silent

Idle Temps:

Chassis

CPU

GPU

HDD

Case

Super Case

19°

14°

28°

23°

Cooler Master Sileo 500

20°

14°

29°

24°

 
 

Load Temps:

 

Chassis

CPU

GPU

HDD

Case

Super Case

28°

16°

29°

23°

Cooler Master Sileo 500

34°

18°

30°

26°

 

From this we can see that the temps are slightly higher than that of the Super Case. The inside of the case is insulated so I was still impressed at how little rise in temp there was. Some may be looking at the spike in the CPU temp but you have to realize that the inside of the Super Case has an exhaust port right out of the side over the CPU. Overall I really do think that the Cooler Master Sileo 500 Chassis did alright. It might not have been designed with cooling in mind, but when it came to noise, bar none, it is the quietest I have ever heard, or I guess didn’t hear. I have used some gaming cases in the past, and to see the numbers of this case not far off of those cases is amazing. Something that we have to keep in mind is that this was all done with a stock CPU cooler and fans, a quick addition of either or both of these would surely drop the temp of any computer, and in theory with the noise damping foam you most likely won’t hear the addition of these either.

Let’s get to my final thoughts:

Conclusion:

So what did I think? I thought this case was great. For the low price this case is a great buy, if used right. Currently I have two PCs, one that I use for my benchmarks, and one that I use as a media center. There is no doubt in my mind that gamers might not want to fight over this case, unless they have the equipment to keep their computer cool and are looking to reduce it sound. If you are the type of person that’s like me and you have a PC connected to your TV, then you know how distracting it is to have the hum of a PC drown out a movie, or bright LEDs draw your eye away. With this case I found a complete turnaround, with this case’s extremely low noise output I found my videos much more enjoyable, and with almost no LEDs I found that that case wasn’t distracting at all

Would I recommend this Case? Well what type of person are you. If you are someone looking to upgrade there home theater PC or just looking for a way to reduce the noise in your office, then this is the case for you and I would have to say that I fully recommend it for those purposes. However if you’re a hardcore gamer then you will most likely want to look elsewhere. The features that make this case just don’t appeal to some gamers. I found that the noise dampening foam actually insulated the case a little making it warmer, and with few places to mount case fans it soon makes it quite warm inside this little guy. Don’t get me wrong there are gamers out there that would like a silent compute, and they have the ability and know how to mod their case and add fans and various coolers.

Pros:

  • Low cost
  • Silent
  • Sleek, Sexy, Doesn’t Have To Show Off
  • eSata
  • Good Tool Less Case
  • Blue LEDs
  • Expansion Slots are Tool Less

Cons:

  • Limited Cooling Options
  • Sound Dampening Foam Insulates Heat

Recent Posts