Cavalry Pelican 2.5″ SATA and USB SSD Review


Up until now the only way to get high-speed HDD power was to go with a raptor. The problem with going for a 10,00RPM Hard Drive is the longevity on these drives, While impressive for how fast they move, didn’t last as long as you would want from such an expensive drive. Now with major leaps and jumps in the world of Solid State Drive Technology, we are seeing some serious speeds coming from SSD’s. The drives may not be very big but they are more than large enough to run your OS and if you put out a little more cheddar you can get a very decent-sized drive that you saw in the past for SSD’s. The Cavalry Pelican 2.5″ SATA and USB SSD will be put through the paces today by going up against some mid-sized drives and a larger 720GB Samsung. Let’s check out the drive first:
Provided by: Cavalry

Closer Look:

The packaging for the Pelican 2.5″ SATA and USB SSD is nice and simple you get to see what you get right off the bat which I like. Simple clean design and all of the specs and features you could ever want.

Included with the Drive and a USB to Mini USB cable incase you want to use your Pelican 2.5” SSD like an external hard drive. This is a nice feature you can also easily boot off of a USB Device, you can go from your SATA port at home and boot up with your USB at your office.

Let’s check out the specs and features:

The Cavalry Pelican Internal/External solid-state drive is the superlative replacement for your standard 2.5-inch hard disk drive, delivering silent operation and the greatly enhanced durability, performance, and power efficiency of solid-state technology.  With no moving parts, the Pelican does not need to spin up to write or seek files like a conventional hard disk drive, delivering considerable increases in performance while greatly reducing the risk of mechanical failure.  Inside thin & light and ultraportable laptops, this incredible drive simultaneously extends your battery life, increases computing performance, and ensures the safety of your data, all the while operating in complete silence.

Features & Specifications:

  • 32 GB 2.5” SSD
  • SATA II (when used as internal)/USB 2.0 (when used as external) Interface
  • Sequential read/write: 130MB/sec & 90MB/sec
  • Random read/write: 80MB/sec & 25MB/sec
  • Noiseless (Acoustic = 0dB)
  • Ultra-durable (Operation temperature 0°C to 70°C and withstands Operation shock 15000G)
  • Low power consumption (5V, 200mA)
  • Complete metal casing
  • Mean time before failure (MTBF): 1,300,000hrs +
  • Access time: 0.1ms
  • Friendly, unlimited, domestic, and free customer/tech support which extends beyond the limited warranty
  • Dimensions: 2.75″ x 3.94″ x 0.31″ (69.8mm x 100.0mm x 7.9mm)
  • Weight: 0.2lbs

Let’s get to the testing:

Testing Setup:

  • Processor: Intel Core2 Quad Q9450
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X48-DQ6
  • Memory: OCZ 2 x 2GB
  • Video Card: Asus EAH 4830
  • Power Supply: Coolmax USA 950w Modular Power Supply
  • Hard Drive: Seagate 750GB SATA
  • Optical Drive: LG DVD
  • OS: Windows Vista Ultimate
  • Thermaltake armor

Testing:

For testing to ensure the best possible testing I won’t be doing a boot up vista test because it is simply to inaccurate a test for my liking. For a real world type test I will be timing how long it takes to copy over a 10, 100, and 500MB file through USB and SATA. I will be benchmarking the drive through both USB and SATA using Everest Ultimate and HDTune. For HDTune and the file transfers I will be using a 320GB Samsung. For the Everest testing I will be using a 720GB Seagate.

The reason I chose these two drives is because they are a good range of mid and large drive sizes. The reason the 320GB isn’t being used for Everest is because I leant it to a friend before I could benchmark it with Everest (sorry guys)

USB HDTune and File Transfer:

USB Benchmarks

Pelican 2.5” 32GB SSD

Samsung 320GB

Average (Mbps)

30.9

31.2

Access Time (Ms)

.4

17.5

Burst Rate (Mbps)

28

27.0

CPU Usage

2.8%

5.5%

 File Size

 Pelican 2.5” 32GB SSD

 Samsung 320GB

 10 MB

 .5 sec

 1 sec

 100 MB

 5.5 sec

 5.5 sec

 500 MB

 17 sec

 17 sec

 SATA HDTune and File Transfer:

 eSATA Benchmarks

Pelican 2.5” 32GB SSD

 Samsung 320GB

 Average (Mbps)

 96.6

 38.3

 Access Time (Ms)

 .2

 17.2

 Burst Rate (Mbps)

90

 84.1

 CPU Usage

 2.9%

 1.2%

 File Size

Pelican 2.5” 32GB SSD

 Samsung 320GB

 10 MB

 .25

 1

 100 MB

 3

 4

 500 MB

 7

 8

USB and SATA only go so fast so that is why we see similar speeds for most of these tests one thing worth noting is how the Cavalry Pelican 2.5″ SATA and USB SSD destroyed the Samsung in access times by a very note able margin. Lets see how well it does against Everest and a bigger drive.

 Pelican SSD USB Everest:

SATA Pelican SSD Everest:

SATA Seagate Barracuda Everest: 

We can easily see the Cavalry Pelican 2.5” SSD is rock solid all the way through with little to no fluctuation. The access times are incredibly fast. When you are dealing with very important files having a rock solid drive with as little moving parts as possible is key, SSD’s are bulletproof when it comes to longevity compared to standard hard drives. Let’s see the final thoughts:

Conclusion:

Compared to your standard hard drive SSD’s are still very pricy, if you can get past that issue then you will be a very happy camper picking one of these up. I love the fact I can drop this thing and chances are my data will still be there and be uncorrupted. These drives are the way of the future and companies like OCZ are coming out with whopping 1TD SSD drives you can use from your PCI-E slot. I think with this amazing technology getting better and better all the time, we will start seeing more affordable versions come out. This little 32GB model is perfect for everything you need to run on an OS for now if you are looking for a budget SSD drive.

Would I recommend this drive? Absolutely, it’s a decent price compared to its big brothers, while still being big enough to be useful. The access times alone makes it hands down the best drive I have personally owned. Granted there are higher end SSD’s that are even faster but this SSD is an awesome price and significantly improves performance over a standard HDD.

Pro’s:

  • Price
  • Performance 
  • Fits In Your Laptop
  • USB Feature
  • Compact
  • Longevity
  • Low Power
  • No Noise
  • Runs a lot Cooler Than HDD

Con’s:

  • Might be Small For Some

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